Apache, MySQL and Storage Clustering

icesteed shared this idea 3 years ago
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Hey guys,

So I run a website and well I thought it would be really awesome to add support for clustering in terms of storage, apache and MySQl. The reason being is, an intermediate user with linux like me, may not want to screw up their server by going through a bunch of online guides just to figure out how to set your server up for storage clustering or even Apache clustering.

The reason or the idea behind it is so that a root user who has access to WHM can easily setup clustering without the need for any online guide that may mistakenly screw your server up badly.

So it would be nice to hear from you all in regards to this to see what you think of the idea! :)

Comments (8)

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cPanel & WHM currently supports MySQL Clustering. I would recommend looking over the following resources for more information:

http://forums.cpanel.net/f5/cpanel-mysql-clustering-68066.html

http://docs.cpanel.net/twiki/pub/AllDocumentation/TrainingResources/TrainingSlides07/MySQL_Remote_Server.pdf

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Is there any guide on how to set up Storage clustering for cPanel and WHM>

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Does it support apache clustering ?

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It's not supported, but you could make your own, you probably wouldn't want to get into that by yourself though.

The difficulty in Apache / PHP clustering is maintaining the files on sync since people can either use FTP, GIT, PHP uploaders, files created on-the-fly, and there's so many other ways to modify and add files. NFS used to be viable, but it's slow, you could try to dig around GlusterFS as an option.

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Hello!

Now that ver 62 is out, is there an update here on this features viability?

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No update for this one, or any of the other clustering options yet. As soon as there is we'll be here to let everyone know!

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Ideally one could just patch in other servers via ssh and this would create either extended capacity (spread load, more storage, etc) or failover structure (one server fails, another takes seamlessly over).

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That would be alot of work for ssh. Not only do you have to replicate all your data to the other servers you will need to send monitor data through constantly and would need to decode the keypairs each time just for simple tasks such as the heartbeat monitor. Ssh would be creating different mounts under different drives not a shared storage pool and has no way for protecting this. At the moment type 1 hypervisors would be your best bet.

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