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cPanel for Raspberry pi

tui shared this idea 5 years ago
Not Planned

The minimun requirements for cPanel are a 226 MHz processor and 768 MB Ram, the Raspberry pi 2 has a 900MHz quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 CPU and 1GB RAM.


A cPanel (or light cpanel) versión for this device would be great, it could help to manage small home/office projects and websites (or even some big websites?); we run some rpi2 as a web servers and backups servers without any kind of lag or problems, also we run some devices for testing purposes, other devices for pre-production and current developing projects for our clients and we have some devices running small-mid websites in production but there is a lack of a complete panel for server and websites management as cPanel, so everything must be manually done.


Also a cPanel DNS only and cPanel Email only version would be viable for this kind of devices so we can run our Dns's servers and Email servers at home or office with our Rpi2.


I think that a lot of developers would benefit from this control panel so they can develop, run and test their projects in home or office servers before publish them to the world.


I think that this kind of ARM devices are growing and are gaining ground with giant steps, in a very near future we are going to have this kind of devices with large capacities and endless possibilities, they are cheap, affordable and easy to get, they are similar or even bigger than a home/office computer, they consume very little power, they can be moved easily, they can be replaced quickly, they are better than a vps (are like hardware vps) and they are growing.


So i think that a cPanel versión for this devices is a must be.

Best Answer
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Currently cPanel is not planning to pursue support for the Raspberry pi or similar devices. Comments for this request are now locked, but feel free to continue to express your opinions using the up- and down-vote buttons.

Comments (14)

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1

Sounds nice, but cPanel is far too bloated to run well on a Pi, and I personally don't see this as a viable hosting concern due to the limitations the hardware presents. You're better off just making the interface with Lua (you can piggyback on OpenWRT's webui easily), which works quite well on a Pi. There's also places such as elance/odesk where you can contract devops to get your expected product. As a sysadmin, I strongly advise against using a Pi as a client server, especially for production use. Yandex alone could smash it in one crawl :)

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With the newest RPi3 it should absolutely be possible to run in. Not extremely fast, but still well enough.

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Currently cPanel is not planning to pursue support for the Raspberry pi or similar devices. Comments for this request are now locked, but feel free to continue to express your opinions using the up- and down-vote buttons.

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2

At the request of a twitterer I've re-opened comments here. We're still not seeing much interest, but if you have any new use-cases please do post them here!

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The new raspberry pi 3 has 1.2 GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53, 1GB LPDDR2 (900 MHz), Centos can run on it in version 7 32bit (cpanel does not support it) but a x64 version of centos 7 is expected to be out very soon for rpi3

The pine64 has also a 64bit Quad Core ARM A53 1.2GHz CPU and 2GB DDR3 SDRAM,

I think that a version of cpanel/whm for this device should be very useful for a lot of dev's, thinking to use it in test servers or internal projects, small projects etc... as i said before, this kind of device has endless possibilities, they are cheap, affordable and easy to get, they are similar or even bigger than a home/office computer, they consume very little power, they can be moved easily, they can be replaced quickly, they are better than a vps (are like hardware vps) and they are growing very fast.

Imagine a DNS only server on this device's, Mail only server, HTML only, etc.

Imagin a farm of this devices running as multiple mirror servers.

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2

+1 for this. I don't see why not and It would be nice to have a backup environment like that ready to go just in case. I would definitely purchase one more additional license if it could be installed on the pi3.

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Thanks, Carlos! When I last talked to development, the primary concern was the underlying infrastructure of the system. Pi's have come so far, and are pretty incredible little machines. If we start to see any significant traction on the request, we may revisit our consideration.

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2

I have a pi3b. I would cringe at trying to run cPanel on it. It barely likes to run minimal transcodes for plex.

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Maybe not a full replacement of cpanel, but it would be great to run services on this device separately (dns, mail, etc.) also this devices are perfectly for backups

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I wouldn't use a Pi in a production environment for ANY solution. It runs on insecure versions of ssh and other services. It's not meant to be for outside access in production environments. They tell you right on their own website to not use it in a production environment.


I originally got one to do backups. When I loaded it up and felt exactly how insecure it was I immediately turned around and spent $200 on a Dell PowerEdge T20 and another $200 on 2x2TB HD's, and I host it out of my house with each account encrypted (Pi couldn't handle the encryption in a reasonable way/time frame either).

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As centOS has offically released an arm64 release: https://lists.centos.org/pipermail/centos-announce/2017-January/022193.html


I think having an ARM version of cPanel might be something worth considering in the future, especially as Qualcomm, APM, and AMD move to producing ARM based servers to compete with the lower power XEON D Intel Servers. Not that I would ever want to run a server on a Rasperberry Pi, but having a lower power server for a client that needs the extra security for things like HIPPA, etc is intruiging.

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Would love to see this available. I run a Centos 7 Raspberry Pi 3 and it would be great to be able to test and develop on it. Or even just have DNSOnly available..

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No with Pi 4 that is more powerful than many production vps servers out there (4 core, 4gb ram, able to connect to ssd not just sdcard), having cpanel would be just great. I know i would pay for licence if it would work on my pi. Webmin is functiona and does everything great (AND FREE), but i am more used to cpanel.

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I still not sure the Pi is the best solution for this, but we are starting to see more and more ARM based servers go into use with Centos 7 & 8. Still not sure if these servers would be good candidates for cPanel based servers, but even as companies like Apple move to ARM based CPUs, you are going to see them become more popular in the future.


Pi based datacenter operations are never going to happen though, simply from a reliability based approach. But if cPanel was to start supporting ARM based servers, then the technology could be made to work.

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I just got an RPi 4 B+. It has a 1.8 GHz quad-core CPU, 4GB of RAM, and a gigabit ethernet port. I bought a class 10 64GB microSD for primary storage, and plan to attach a 1TB SSD via USB3 that should move data at 350 MBps.


This is a far more powerful platform than the hardware available when cPanel was created, or even in use 10 years ago.

You guys are NEVER going to see much interest in supporting it because the people who buy this hardware are cheap and will spend more on "hats" for their hardware than any software they'd ever find. If it's not a tangible thing, they generally won't pay for it.

I ran a little box connected to a local ISP as a co-lo deal for 8+ years. It ran Debian on a 600 MHz x86 clone with 256MB of RAM and a 20GB HDD over a 10MB ethernet trunk. I used WebMin as my "control panel" and it did what I needed, which wasn't much. After the HDD died the 3rd time, I put it to rest and switched to a commercial web host who offered cPanel. That was around 2006. I don't think the hardware at the time was as powerful as these RPi4s are today. Many web host providers still don't offer 100 meg ethernet, and 1GB isn't even an option with many. When they don't mention the speed, I figure it's still 10 or 100 megs.

There are companies building arrays of RPI4s configured as clusters that they rent out by the month or the hour as needed. They're a LOT cheaper to buy, to power, and to cool, than hardware with the latest Xeon CPUs.

It may be time to take a look at these little devices and come up with a strategy for supporting them. It's not like they'd set you back a lot to do some basic testing and development work.

Throw in Softaculous scripts to load Plex and media support, and people might actually start to take an interest in using it for home systems. But you won't get the kinds of fees you get from large web hosts. Just a WAY larger potential market.

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