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Debian Support and Ubuntu Server LTS Support

Nathan Lierbo shared this idea 6 years ago
Not Planned

I really wish that cPanel had Debian support! I and many other people much prefer apt instead of yum. Almost all of the other paid control panels support Debian...


Original thread: http://forums.cpanel.net/f145/debian-support-ubuntu-server-lts-support-153517.html

Best Answer
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Sorry for my delay here, folks. Currently this isn't on our list of things to do, for a multitude of reasons. The biggest of those reasons is close to what most of you have postulated: the resources it would take to add support for Debian do not seem to be justified by the number of new people that would use cPanel on a Debian machine.

At this point I believe that this discussion has exhausted the biggest reasons one might want to use cPanel on a Debian server, as opposed to a RedHat/CentOS/CloudLinux server, but if you feel you have something to add please feel free to let us know!

Comments (25)

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With RHEL price increasing, why not add support for Ubuntu server or debian ?

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I can't believe cPanel is still not available for Ubuntu. Ubuntu has large community and adding support with debian based OSes will only benefit cPanel.


I hope they will consider adding new OSes.

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Would really appreciate Debian/Ubuntu LTS support in cPanel especially since FreeBSD support was removed.

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Please, cPanel, see by yourself a lot of peoples want to install cPanel on Ubuntu : https://www.google.ca/search?q=ubuntu+cpanel#q=install+cpanel+ubuntu


If Ubuntu users can't install cPanel, then they are looking for something similar to cPanel : we all love cPanel, but prefer another operating system than CentOS.


By being not compatible, you just help another control panel, that may become someday more popular than cPanel for this reason.


Ubuntu is not the most widely used distro on desktop, and is the favorite platform of cloud infrastructures like OpenStack. Wikipedia is running on Ubuntu servers.


What are you guys waiting for this? :)

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+ you can use Ksplice with Ubuntu, at no charge! :) Less downtime, better security!

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If you go ubuntu/debian you could get locked into the turnkey linux bitnami ports too. This is a no-brianer in terms of market demand.

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im also looking for ubuntu LTS support for cPanel.

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The reason why I prefer redhat based to debian based is beacause I've never had to change a config file or fix a bug after an update on redhat whereas on debian I have. When this happens you do get a warning that tells you how to proceed. Also for shared hosting, it's preferable to not have to update then OS to a new major version too often.


One advantage of debian vs redhat was that you could update debian to a major version whereas up to redhat 5 this was not supported. Redhat 7 now supports updating from redhat 6.


Centos/Redhat look like they have old versions of software, but they have actually been patched to include alot from the more recent versions.


Unless you're installing your own system and not just letting cpanel do this for you then why would you want to use debian and not redhat ?

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Debian is a good alternative the OS is very stable. With an upgrade process controller by WHM I guess we won't see any upgrade issues.

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When is it going to happen?


I'll be rolling down the floor for an hour (maybe more) the day cPanel will be running on Ubuntu (with nginx) :)

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What advantages does debian have over centos excluding more recent software on their default respositories ?


Centos/Redhat never requires changing a config file and we've neer had an issue running automatic updates. I would nevery do this on a debian.


Centos/Redhat have a longer lifespan, this means you don't need to do a full system upgrade so often (not possible with centos 6, but hopefully is possible with centos 7


cPanel doesn't support adding third party software and have their own software versions for most software.


Centos / Redhat is the most used system on coorporate servers


Taking this into account, for what reason would someone want a debian instead of centos ?


If there aren't any reasons, then I'm not sure there would be many people refusing cPanel because it's only available on the most stable OS. In which can, we prefer cpanel developers work on the other features than working on this.


Of course I might be missing something ? What advantages do debian and ubuntu have for webhosting except making it easy to not need a control pannel by offering more recent versions in their respository ?

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Yes we need Debian support and fast hopefully.... some things are supported with debian and not others that website owners would like to have such as myself this includes anything from certain bots, to auto uploads and downloads depend on what your website is. and the support is there, i have also noticed that they do not change things like ubuntu do which famous words are "If its not broke don't fix it" and support ends allot quicker with ubuntu they just come out with something new ? not really just add something new this is why allot of people go to debian which is one of the oldest and stable linux distros.


so my vote is in thanks and hope to see it soon.

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monarobase wrote:

What advantages does debian have over centos excluding more recent software on their default respositories ?


Centos/Redhat never requires changing a config file and we've neer had an issue running automatic updates. I would nevery do this on a debian.


Centos/Redhat have a longer lifespan, this means you don't need to do a full system upgrade so often (not possible with centos 6, but hopefully is possible with centos 7


cPanel doesn't support adding third party software and have their own software versions for most software.


Centos / Redhat is the most used system on coorporate servers


Taking this into account, for what reason would someone want a debian instead of centos ?


If there aren't any reasons, then I'm not sure there would be many people refusing cPanel because it's only available on the most stable OS. In which can, we prefer cpanel developers work on the other features than working on this.


Of course I might be missing something ? What advantages do debian and ubuntu have for webhosting except making it easy to not need a control pannel by offering more recent versions in their respository ?

As a somewhat recent Linux convert, I too would like to know the advantages of Debian versus CentOS/RedHat. I see a lot of barking, but would like to know where the bite is when it comes to cPanel.


I completely understand if it's simply a comfort factor - maybe lots of folks are more comfortable with Ubuntu-like flavors, but from a techincal perspective, what is the driving factor(s) in wanting Ubuntu support?


Thanks!

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To clarify and put the question into perspective I want to add that responding a question with another question in this matter is the worst way to address the issue.


"What advantages does debian have over centos excluding more recent software on their default respositories ?" -You are obviously not only seeing this with a defensive stance but also going out of your way to avoid the question altogether. Instead it would be much better to be open minded and try to see why the OP asked the question in the first place and if there is such a need for it as seeing 60+ Likes to this question should make the centos/cpanel developers think about this again.


And to answer your question about what advantages does Debian have over centos, there is probably no big ones, but if we are using this as an excuse to avoid limiting software, then heck, am guessing the whole open source ecosystem should simply die out because we don't have "an advantage" over something else. The whole open source idea has grown because we share and work together, not because we compare and see who is bigger than the other. Is this a valid point to make to avoid the question: No, it is not.


"Centos/Redhat never requires changing a config file and we've never had an issue running automatic updates. I would never do this on a debian." - You obviously have neither, used Centos very long, nor have used Debian that long. On both you WILL have both cases, where you need to change files often and also where the need to change them is zero. Basically being biased won't help with the question. Is this a valid point to make to avoid the question: No, it is not.


"Centos/Redhat have a longer lifespan, this means you don't need to do a full system upgrade so often (not possible with centos 6, but hopefully is possible with centos 7" - What does this have to do with the question? Ubuntu for example has a 5 year support system (LTS) and I would answer the same way: What does this have to do with the question. Does this mean that cpanel does not make incremental or full updates in less than 5 years?. Am guessing cPanel makes an update every decade then no? The lifespan does not affect any software in a big way, even more so when the support is several years. It would only affect if the software would only create updates once in a year or so (Which I hope not for the sake of how fast open source works).


"cPanel doesn't support adding third party software and have their own software versions for most software." - This is more of an issue with cPanel than an answer or something positive about cPanel in general. If they do not want to add third party software, that is not a problem. It does not alter the fact that the whole software COULD work on any Debian based system.


"Centos / Redhat is the most used system on coorporate servers" - Really? I recommend rechecking that. Double checking. Triple checking. Specially when just Ubuntu holds more than 50% of Clouds and Debian based systems hold more than 50% of web servers. You want a reason for cPanel to be in Debian based systems, here it is. 50% of the rest of the Market if not more.


"Taking this into account, for what reason would someone want a debian instead of centos ?" - Read your "answers" to the question and then rewrite them to actually answer the question. Your help level is 0% right now.

"If there aren't any reasons, then I'm not sure there would be many people refusing cPanel because it's only available on the most stable OS. In which can, we prefer cpanel developers work on the other features than working on this." You created a biased comment and did not provide any answer that could help the OP, nor any person that comes here asking for the same thing (Again, the 60+ votes say something differently).


"Of course I might be missing something ? What advantages do debian and ubuntu have for webhosting except making it easy to not need a control panel by offering more recent versions in their respository ?" - You are now giving positive reasons to use Debian and Ubuntu, but to be fair, it does answer the question.

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I can't use cPanel cause it doesn't work on Ubuntu/Debian.


CentOS is not great when it comes to running modern software.


A lot of people have more experience with ubuntu / Debian because that's what they are using at home.

A lot of servers are run by CentOS, but that mostly characterises the people who chose it many years ago based on the standards of those days, not the goods/bads of the system itself.

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I *had* to get CentOS for cPanel/WHM, but if cPanel supported Debian, I'd switch to Debian without hesitation.

As an independent entrepreneur with many many flight hours aboard Debian, it becomes really powerful to manage many OS related tasks and tweaks from the console, whereas cPanel/WHM brings up the ease and comfort of web-based administration (not to mention interesting addons like WHMXtra, WHMSonic, and so on).

For that reason, my vote for this feature.

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With the rankings that Debian is more installed on servers than CentOS, so why cPanel is no support for Debian?

Now I just install server on Debian and unfortunately I was forced to look for alternatives to the cPanel: /

Vote for this features.

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I invite everyone to simply post the url of this page in debian and debian based forum and circles so we can let everyone know about how important voting for this request is. From Debian to Ubuntu and beyond. I have already upvoted this and encourage others to do so, having cpanel a CentOS only app basically blocks other distributions from growing in the server world. Opening the chance to work on it in other distributions shows the effect of collaboration that the linux ecosystem is all about.

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I don't think this is a good idea at all.


If cPanel is supporting multiple operating system, it's just going to divide their development team up that much more. They are finally moving things to mostly RPM based, like EasyApache4. But if they support Debian based distros, they'll have to write RPM packages for Redhat/CentOS and deb packages for Debian.


If I recall correctly years ago (YEARS! ago) cPanel did support Debian and FreeBSD and a slew of other operating systems. They finally got smart and consolidated all of this into RHEL and CentOS support. In my opinion they might even be better off to take it a step further and just create their own distro (probably heavily based on RHEL/CentOS).


The vast majority of web hosts don't really understand what differences are apparent in different Linux distros. They just click a button in their cPanel or WHM. If that's the case, what difference does it make what operating system distro is behind the curtain? If everyone is using RHEL/CentOS why take time away from cPanel's development teams to cater to other distros?

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I would not agree with in the sense that I am completely sure that the moment they start supporting cPanel with other distributions (mainly Debian and Ubuntu), many, and I mean many developers will join to help in porting this to this respective distributions (which is the collaborative way in open source). So dividing up the development team of this type of application is not a very strong argument since we are in an open source environment and the amount of developers eager to help is overwhelming.


Additionally, packing for DEB is not complicated (it is at most a 2 hours course) if the application already works in said distribution. It is something very normal at least in the Debian world (the same as the Red Hat world).


A good incentive (and a very good point into what differences there are in the development/production state of servers) is the amount of cloud based or server dedicated based systems that use Debian and Ubuntu (basically having between both more than 70% of the whole Server/Cloud Environment). It means that cPanel would improve their global take in what? 200% more than that what they currently offer?


Anyway, just looking at this from the need of it on other distributions we can see many similar packages appearing that, if cPanel does not take this change into account (as a positive benefit for them), they will surely start seeing competitive packages appearing from DEB/RPM distros that basically compete against the cPanel/WHMCS stronghold that currently exists. There is serverPilot, ZPanel, Vesta and many more. But why we encourage cPanel developers to work in DEB distros, well simply because of the love we have for it and the systems that already use it at the moment (All CentOS/Red Hat which is the minority in servers right now).


At least, until one of the alternatives offers a complete migration solution. Just my 2 cents about caring for cPanel and supporting the decision of them working towards the main distributions in server/clouds based systems.

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Hmm.... Having contributed to the development of packaged product myself, I feel like the incremental cost of supporting another distro (Linux or otherwise) ought to be weighed against the revenue opportunity. Which, I would imaging, is precisely what the cPanel folks are doing. As a long-time Debian/Ubuntu user, I for one favor support for, say, Ubuntu Server LTS. Of course, that said, although I have probably had my hand in installing/configuring upwards of 200 or so Ubuntu Server VPS's (when on owned hardware, I typically lay down VMware ESXI first) over the years, I would probably only have had cause to purchase cPanel licenses for about 5% of those. So, although I would LOVE to see Ubuntu supported, the economics may not be there.

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Please do not implement this if it's going to slow down developement of features unless someone can come with with a reason other than I prefer Debian and don't want to learn Centos/Redhat.


If you do decide to implement this then do it properly by increasing your staff to have a debian team that works on making things work with debian and without reducing normal staff for other feature requests.


I beleive this feature would also increase the amount of support requests so the support team would need to be formes and possibly increased too.

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I'm in two minds about this, I like Ubuntu, but I'm also aware some of our other tools that we use to support our cPanel instances won't work with it (I'm looking at you R1 CDP with your lack of support for a 15 month old Kernel). We've had about 0.01% of our customer base ask for a specific Linux distribution, most people really just don't care. I guess the big one is if someone with a large installed base of Ubuntu (so all their staff are well versed) is coming over to cPanel, but we tend to find those that care what the distro is, generally don't care for cPanel.

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i hardly believe that someone who knows cPanel very well in the first place, and using CentOS just go for Ubuntu... hm, i think it s just a waste of time for developers and any support teams to go this way....

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Sorry for my delay here, folks. Currently this isn't on our list of things to do, for a multitude of reasons. The biggest of those reasons is close to what most of you have postulated: the resources it would take to add support for Debian do not seem to be justified by the number of new people that would use cPanel on a Debian machine.

At this point I believe that this discussion has exhausted the biggest reasons one might want to use cPanel on a Debian server, as opposed to a RedHat/CentOS/CloudLinux server, but if you feel you have something to add please feel free to let us know!